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Plenary speakers

We are pleased to announce a truly outstanding lineup of plenary speakers for PLL3. The five speakers — Mimi Bong, Zoltán Dörnyei,
Lourdes Ortega, Richard Ryan, and Ema Ushioda — are all internationally respected pioneers in their fields, bringing not only cutting-edge scholarship to the conference but also a diverse range of perspectives. In addition to their impressive academic achievements, our speakers are further united by a shared interest in pushing forward in search of new ideas and exploring connections. In accordance with the theme of the conference —Stretching Boundaries — we feel sure that exciting new directions will emerge from what promises to be a unique, interdisciplinary exchange of ideas.

Mimi Bong

Mimi Bong is a Professor of Educational Psychology in the Department of Education and the Associate Director of the Brain and Motivation Research Institute (http://bmri.korea.ac.kr) of Korea University. Her research focuses on adolescent motivation with particular emphases on self-efficacy beliefs and achievement goals. Her most recent research interests include: testing validity of motivation theories by mapping theoretical classifications onto adolescents’ subjective perceptions of their own motivation; integrating interest, goals, and self-efficacy into the academic self-regulatory pathways; and exploring individual differences and socio-cultural factors particularly consequential to adolescents’ academic motivation. In 2006, Bong received the Richard E. Snow Award for Early Career Contributions in Educational Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s Division 15. She is the immediate past Associate Editor of American Educational Research Journal and the Editor-in-Chief of Korean Journal of Educational Psychology. Bong has served or currently serves on the editorial boards of AERA Open, Child Development, Contemporary Educational Psychology, Educational Psychologist, Educational Psychology Review, Educational Researcher, Journal of Educational Psychology, Journal of Experimental Education, and Theory into Practice.

Zoltán Dörnyei

ZoltánDörnyei (PhD in Psycholinguistics, Budapest; PhD in Theology, Durham) is Professor of Psycholinguistics in the School of English, University of Nottingham. Over the past three decades he has published over 90 academic papers and 25 books on various aspects of motivation and second language acquisition, including Motivational Strategies in the Language Classroom (2001, Cambridge University Press; translated into Japanese: 動機づけを高める英語指導ストラテジ. Tokyo: Taishukan Publishing Co.),  Teaching and Researching Motivation (2001, Prentice Hall, 2nd ed. 2011; republished in 2005 by Beijing Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press), Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (2007, Oxford University Press), The Psychology of Second Language Acquisition (2009, Oxford University Press), Questionnaires in Second Language Research (2nd ed., 2010, Routledge; translated into Japanese: 外国語教育学のための質問紙調査入門―作成・実施・データ処理. Tokyo: Shohakusha Publishing Co.), Motivating Learners, Motivating Teachers: Building Vision in the Language Classroom (2014, Cambridge University Press, with M. Kubanyiova; republished by Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2018), The Psychology of the Language Learner Revisited (2015, Routledge, with S. Ryan), Motivational Currents in Language Learning (2016, Routledge, with A. Henry and C. Muir) and Progressive Creation and the Struggles of Humanity in the Bible: A Canonical Narrative Interpretation (2018, Wipf and Stock).

Lourdes Ortega

Lourdes Ortega is a Professor in the Department of Linguistics at Georgetown University. Her main area of research is in second language acquisition, particularly sociocognitive and educational dimensions in adult classroom settings. Before moving to the USA in 1993, she was a teacher of Spanish at the Cervantes Institute in Athens, Greece, and she has also taught English as a second language in the United States, in Hawaii and Georgia. Lourdes was co-recipient of the Pimsleur and the TESOL Research awards (2001) and has been a doctoral Mellon fellow (1999), a postdoctoral Spencer/National Academy of Education fellow (2003), and a senior research fellow at the Freiburg Institute of Advanced Studies (2010). She was Journal Editor of Language Learning (2010-2015) and is a member of the Board of Directors of the University of Michigan’s Language Learning Research Club (2016-2020). She has published widely in journals such as Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, CALICO Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Learning, Language Learning & Technology, Modern Language Journal, Studies in Second Language Acquisition, and System. Her books include Understanding Second Language Acquisition (2009, translated into Mandarin in 2016), and co-edited collections on Technology-mediated TBLT (with Marta González-Lloret, John Benjamins, 2014), The Usage-based Study of Language Learning and Multilingualism (with Ande Tyler and colleagues, Georgetown University Press, 2016), and Complexity Theory and Language Development: In Honor of Diane Larsen-Freeman (with ZhaoHong Han, 2017). She is currently busy co-editing (with Annick De Houwer) The Handbook of Bilingualism for Cambridge University Press.

Richard M. Ryan

Richard M. Ryan, Ph.D. is a Professor at the Institute for Positive Psychology and Education at the Australian Catholic University and a Research Professor in the Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology at the University of Rochester. He is a clinical psychologist and co-developer of Self-Determination Theory, an internationally recognized leading theory of human motivation. He lectures frequently in the United States and aboard on the factors that promote motivation and healthy psychological and behavioral functioning. Ryan is among the most cited researchers in psychology and social sciences today and the author of over 350 papers and books in the areas of human motivation, personality, and psychological well-being, including Self-determination theory: Basic psychological needs in motivation, development and wellness (Ryan & Deci, 2017, Guilford). Reflective of Ryan’s influence internationally and across disciplines, he has been recognized as one of the eminent psychologists of the modern era, Post-World War II (Diener, Oishi & Parker, 2014, Archives of Scientific Psychology). He has also been honored with three lifetime achievement awards for his contributions to the field on motivation, personal meaning, and self and identity, and has received an honorary degree from the University of Thessaly and an honorary membership to the German Psychological Society.

Please click here for some of Richard M. Ryan’s latest works.

Ema Ushioda

Ema Ushioda is Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor at the Centre for Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, where she directs the Centre’s doctoral programme and oversees postgraduate teaching and learning provision. She has been working in the language education field for over 30 years as a teacher, teacher educator and researcher, and was based for several years at Trinity College in Dublin before moving to the University of Warwick in 2002. She is internationally well-known for her work on motivation and autonomy in language learning, particularly for promoting qualitative approaches to researching motivation, and has published widely in these areas. Recent books include International perspectives on motivation: Language learning and professional challenges (2013), Teaching and researching motivation (co-authored by Dörnyei, 2011), and Motivation, language identity and the L2 self (co-edited by Dörnyei, 2009). She has also recently co-edited with Dörnyei a special issue of the Modern Language Journal (Fall 2017) on ‘Beyond global English: Motivation to learn languages in a multicultural world’. Ema is currently working on a monograph addressing ethical perspectives on language learning motivation research.

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